A beautiful, peculiar molecule

| April 15, 2014
Sir Harold Kroto, Nobel Laureate, speaks at the Profiles in Innovation Presidential Speaker Series on April 14, 2014.

Sir Harold Kroto, Nobel Laureate, speaks at the Profiles in Innovation Presidential Speaker Series on April 14, 2014.

The NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing hosted Sir Harold Kroto, co-winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, for a talk on Monday, April 14 on his discovery. News@Northeastern covers the talk:

“Carbon is pecu­liar,” said Nobel lau­reate Sir Harold Kroto. “More pecu­liar than you think.” He was speaking to a standing-​​room-​​only audi­ence that filled the Raytheon Amphithe­ater on Monday after­noon for the latest install­ment of North­eastern University’s Pro­files in Inno­va­tion Pres­i­den­tial Speaker Series hosted by Nadine Aubry, dean of the Col­lege of Engineering.

Kroto shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in chem­istry with his col­lab­o­ra­tors Richard Smalley and Robert Curl for their dis­covery of one of the universe’s most pecu­liar forms of carbon. In the mid-​​70s Kroto and his col­leagues had detected the pres­ence of a long-​​chain carbon mol­e­cule in the giant gas clouds lin­gering between dis­tant stars using state-​​of-​​the-​​art radio-​​telescopes.

Read more at News@Northeastern…