3Qs: The 3-​​D printing of tomorrow

| March 14, 2013
Professor Ahmed Busnaina’s method of directed assembly is faster, cheaper, and more versatile than traditional 3-D printing. What does it mean? Could $10 iPhones and tissue engineering breakthroughs be just the tip of the iceberg. (Northeastern file photo.)

Professor Ahmed Busnaina’s method of directed assembly is faster, cheaper, and more versatile than traditional 3-D printing. What does it mean? Could $10 iPhones and tissue engineering breakthroughs be just the tip of the iceberg. (Northeastern file photo.)

Ahmed Bus­naina, the William Lin­coln Smith Pro­fessor and director of the NSF Nanoscale Sci­ence and Engi­neering Center for High-​​rate Nanoman­u­fac­turing at North­eastern, has devel­oped a method called directed assembly that he calls the 3-​​D printing of tomorrow. It is faster, cheaper, and more ver­sa­tile than tra­di­tional 3-​​D printing, and he said it could enable a wave of inno­va­tion not cur­rently fea­sible. Here, we asked Bus­naina to describe this process and its poten­tial impact in areas such as health, elec­tronics, and the environment. (Article by Angela Herring, March 14, 2013)

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